The Sunday Diigo Links Post (weekly)

December 17, 2012 at 8:05 pm | In links | Comments Off on The Sunday Diigo Links Post (weekly)
  • Right on.
    QUOTE
    Not being able to share photos seamlessly from one social network to another may be the epitome of a “first world problem;” getting lost in the Australian outback because your smartphone manufacturer replaced a bulletproof mapping app with its inferior homemade version is a bit more serious. But in either case, the essential value of these information technologies–their ability to seamlessly interface with each other as only bits, rather than atoms, can–is being purposely eroded. The vision is almost comically retrograde: Twitter, Google, Apple, and Facebook each seem to think that they can provide every conceivable digital functionality to the user all on their own at each other’s expense, much like GM’s “kitchen of tomorrow” at the 1964 World’s Fair promised to meet every need of a 20th-century housewife with one brand. Fifty years later, nobody has (or wants) a kitchen built solely out of General Motors products. So why do Twitter and Facebook act like there is a personal information-technology equivalent?
    UNQUOTE

    tags: mit_techreview internet apps silos john_pavlus

  • Key point re. the dedicated once-a-week big grocery shop, versus the ability to pop into the neighborhood grocery store (or cafe or pub) for that quick, daily stock-up…
    QUOTE
    But for all of the other business types examined, bikers actually out-consumed drivers over the course of a month. True, they often spent less per visit. But cyclists and pedestrians in particular made more frequent trips (by their own estimation) to these restaurants, bars and convenience stores, and those receipts added up. This finding is logical: It’s a lot easier to make an impulse pizza stop if you’re passing by an aromatic restaurant on foot or bike instead of in a passing car at 35 miles an hour. Such frequent visits are part of the walkable culture. Compare European communities – where it’s common to hit the bakery, butcher and fish market on the way home from work – to U.S. communities where the weekly drive to Walmart’s supermarket requires an hour of dedicated planning.
    UNQUOTE

    tags: atlantic_cities emily_badger bicycles cycling economies cities walkability

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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